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Eventbrite: intelligent personalisation
Atlassian: a mobile app for JIRA?

Eventbrite: intelligent personalisation

I’m a frequent user of Eventbrite; an app that helps you discover events of interest in your city, view events your friends are attending and conveniently manage your tickets. Packs quite a punch for one little app. One feature I would find useful however, would be intelligent personalisation.

Eventbrite offer the option for users to sign in with Facebook. This facilitates access to a wealth of information.

The app could tell me how many of my friends are attending a particular event at a glance for example. They could even sort the events in order of most number of friends attending.

Depending on the amount of information they choose to access from Facebook’s social graph, Eventbrite could suggest events I’d likely be interested in and over time, become smarter and smarter about those suggestions.

And finally, when an event is recommended to me, I’d like to know why. Is it because I’ve attended a previous event that’s similar? Is it because I’ve attended 6 events with a Facebook friend in the past and he’s attending one I haven’t yet registered for?

Insightful recommendations will more likely translate into action because I have an informed reason to act.

Figure 1 below illustrates how these ideas can be seamlessly incorporated into the existing UI within the Recommended tab in the Discover section.
 

Figure 1: A suggestion on how intelligent personalisation could be incorporated.

Figure 1: A suggestion on how intelligent personalisation could be incorporated.


 

Intelligent personalisation will greatly improve upon an already valuable app. The easiest way for Eventbrite to determine whether users would find this feature useful is to start by conducting a series of user interviews and if all goes well, setup some A/B tests to consider the best way to implement.

June 2014

Atlassian: a mobile app for JIRA?

When I was running Cornershop (the start-up I co-founded), my co-founder and I made a very deliberate decision on day one to use the best possible tools available on the market to keep ourselves organised.

We chose Atlassian JIRA to manage our releases and track issues, feature ideas, requirements, defects and customer feedback. It was one of the few tools I’ve used in my professional life that was a pleasure to use. It got out of the way and let us (along with our broader team of offshore developers) do our jobs well.

JIRA is (currently) a web-based product only. At the time of writing, they don’t have a mobile or tablet offering which would greatly assist in keeping on top of events while on the go (which was very often for me.)

Granted, the web version is somewhat responsive and can run on tablet devices (mobile is a bit of a stretch though) but the user experience is far from ideal. It’s worth noting that Atlassian do support third-party developers creating their own apps which integrate with JIRA but the contestants in this department have been somewhat of a let down to be frank.

If Atlassian took the time to build JIRA as a native mobile application, I believe they could offer a slew of incredibly useful features. Here are just three ideas that could significantly enhance a mobile experience (if it were ever to materialise.)
 

Figure 2: Quick swipe for common actions.

Figure 2: Quick swipe for common issue actions.


 

Figure 3: Efficient search and filter capability.

Figure 3: Efficient search and filter capability.


 

Figure 4: Favourite filters are just a swipe away.

Figure 4: Favourite filters are just a swipe away.


 

A good quality mobile offering would undoubtedly make JIRA even more appealing to users and it’s not too much of a stretch for Atlassian to put something together.

The demand seems to be there based on the popularity of third-party applications so my advice to Atlassian would be to release a minimum viable product and work on the most essential/high priority features first as determined by users.

June 2014